Teacher Tip – Getting your students to speak

Many of our adult ESL students are hesitant to use their English. They are afraid they will not be understood, or they are embarrassed by their pronunciation. Here are some tips for helping your students overcome their fear of speaking. Create a warm atmosphere. Whether you are teaching a group or tutoring one-on-one, the first […]

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Phonetics Videos

The link below, shared by one of our newest volunteers Simone, is a great tool for people learning both English and Spanish. A video graphic pops up for each sound allowing students to see which mouth formations lead to which sounds. Simone used the videos with students in Chile to break down the most complicated […]

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Teaching Pronunciation Using a New Tool

In December I taught a Pronunciation Class and I used a new tool called the Color Vowel Chart. English has 14-16 commonly used vowel sounds, whereas many other languages have 4-7, so needless to say our students struggle with many of these brand new sounds. With the chart, each vowel sound is associated with the […]

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Prioritizing Pronunciation

Jennifer Jenkins is an expert in the field of “Global English” – English taught outside of the US. She has an interesting and useful well-researched theory about how to prioritize pronunciation needs for interactions between non-native English speakers. This theory has been developed into a pronunciation core known as the Lingua Franca Core. The name […]

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On-line Minimal Pair Practice

The Many Things website offers a fantastic tool for students to work on pronunciation using minimal pairs. This link will take you to a list of minimal pairs lessons. Each lesson provides an opportunity for students to hear and produce the sound. The lesson ends with a quiz where students will hear a sound and have […]

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/e/ and /ey/

/e/ is a short relaxed vowel sound. The cheeks, lips, and tongue should all be relaxed.   The/ey/ sound is longer than the /e/ sound and is tense. The mouth opens in a wide circle when saying /ey/.   Read these words to your student(s) and have them repeat.   /ey/         […]

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