/i/ and /e/

/i/ and /e/ are both short, relaxed vowel sounds, so they are somewhat similar. To make the /i/sound, the tongue is down and relaxed in your mouth. Your lips should be relaxed as well, and be sure not to move them.   To make the /e/ sound, you should also be relaxed, but your mouth opens a […]

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/t/ and /th/

When making the /t/ sound, the tip of your tongue should be behind your upper teeth. Your tongue should be tense, and you shouldn’t be able to breathe right before making the sound.   When making the /th/ sound, the tip of the tongue sticks out briefly a tiny bit and is pressed against the upper […]

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/d/ and /th/

When making the /d/ sound, the tip of your tongue should be placed on the front part of the roof of your mouth, right behind your upper teeth. Your tongue should also be tense, and your vocal chords should be voiced or vibrating when you make this sound. The sound is released as a puff of air when […]

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/i/ and /ee/

/i/ is a short relaxed vowel sound. The lips are not spread, and the cheeks and tongue should feel relaxed. The /ee/ sound is longer than the /i/ sound. When you make the /ee/ sound, your tongue should be tense and you should be smiling, like when you say “cheese” before someone takes a picture.   Read […]

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/b/ and /v/

When making the /v/ sound, the lower lip moves up and does not touch the lower teeth. The /v/ sound is voiced, which means that we use our vocal chords to make it.  If you place your hand on your throat when making the /v/ sound you will feel a vibration. When making the /b/ sound, the […]

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Help Your Student with Accent Training

Your student is speaking English. Yes! But when she goes to the store, the cashier has a hard time understanding her. Now her confidence is shot. It’s time for accent training to help her speak more clearly. At Train Your Accent, you can listen to short recorded speeches on various topics. Each speech comes with […]

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